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The United States women's national soccer team, often referred to as USWNT, represents the United States of America in international association football competitions. It is controlled by United States Soccer Federation and competes in CONCACAF (the Confederation of North, Central American and Caribbean Association Football). The U.S. team won the first everWomen's World Cup in 1991, and has since been a superpower in women's soccer.[1] It is currently ranked first in the world by the FIFA Women's World Rankings.[2] The team has also won the 1999 Women's World Cup, four Olympic women's gold medals (1996,[3] 2004,[4] 2008[5] and 2012) and nine Algarve Cups (2000, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2007, 2008, 2010, 2011 and 2013).

Among its many other honors, the team was selected as the U.S. Olympic Committee's Team of the Year in 1997 and 1999. Sports Illustrated chose the entire team as its 1999 Sportspeople of the Year.[6]

ContentsEdit

 [hide*1 History

History[edit]Edit

The team played its first match at the Mundialito tournament on August 12, 1985, coached by Mike Ryan (not related to 2005–2007 coach Greg Ryan). In March 2004, two of its stars, Mia Hamm (who retired later that year after a post-Olympic team tour of the USA) and Michelle Akers (who had already retired), were the only two women and the only two Americans named to the FIFA 100, a list of the 125 greatest living soccer players chosen by Pelé as part of FIFA's centenary observances. Those two women along with Julie FoudyKristine Lilly, and the 1999 team started a revolution towards women's team sports in America.

Arguably their most influential and memorable victory came in the 1999 World Cup when they beat China 5–4 in a penalty shootout.[7] With this win they emerged onto the world stage and brought significant media attention to women's soccer and athletics. On July 10, 1999, over 90,000 people (the largest ever for a women’s sporting event and one of the largest attendances in the world for a tournament game final) filled the Rose Bowl to watch the United States play China in the Final. After a back and forth game, the score was tied 0–0 at full-time, and remained so after extra time, leading to a penalty kick shootout. With Briana Scurry's save of China's third kick, the score was 4–4 with only Brandi Chastain left to shoot. She scored and won the game for the United States. Chastain famously dropped to her knees and whipped off her shirt, celebrating in her sports bra, which later made the cover of Sports Illustrated and the front pages of newspapers around the country and world.[8] This win influenced girls to want to play soccer on a team.[9][10]

Perhaps the second most influential victory came on July 10, 2011, in the quarterfinal of the 2011 Women's World Cup in Germany, where the U.S. beat Brazil 5–3 on penalty kicks. Abby Wambach tied the game 2–2 in the 2nd minute of extra time in the 2nd period of overtime (the 122nd minute of the match overall) with a left-footed cross by Megan Rapinoe.[11] Earlier in the game, Brazil had evened the score 1–1 on a controversial penalty kick. Interestingly, the game was played on the 12th anniversary of the memorable 1999 World Cup Final (described above), which the US also won on penalty kicks.

In the 2012 Summer Olympics, the U.S. won the gold medal for the fourth time in five Olympics by defeating Japan 2–1 in front of 80,203 fans at Wembley Stadium, a record for a women's soccer game at the Olympics.[12] The United States advanced to face Japan in a rematch of 2011 Women’s World Cup final, won by the Japanese on penalty kicks, by winning arguably one of the greatest games only rivaled by the victories mentioned above. In the semi-final match against Canada, the Americans trailed three times before Alex Morgan’s header in the third minute of injury time at the end of 30 minutes of extra-time lifted the team to a 4–3 victory. Morgan’s game-winning goal (123") is now the latest tally ever in a FIFA competition.[13] The London Olympics marked the first time the USWNT won every game en route to the gold medal and set an Olympic women's team record of 16 goals scored.[13] Wambach scored a team-leading five goals in five straight games, which is an U.S. and Olympic record, while Morgan and Rapinoe led the team with four assists apiece, which attributed to their team-high tying 10 points.[13] By scoring both goals in the 2012 Olympic final, Carli Lloyd is the only woman in history to score the winning goal in separate gold Olympic matches (2008 and 2012).

In the 2013 season, USA had an undefeated record of 14-0-2 with their last win against Brazil with a score of 4-1.

Past and present kits[edit]Edit

Traditionally since the team started, the kit has been an all-white kit, with occasional blue shorts. Blue shorts in combination with blue or red jersey and socks have also been used. Combinations of red, white and blue were used in 2003 World Cup, and 2004 Olympics. From 2012, the team's kit is identical to that worn by the men's team. Like the men's teamNike is the team's kit manufacturer. The team also wears two stars above the US Soccer badge, to signify their two championship titles from World Cup competitions.

[1] 1986–1996 home [2] 1986–1996 [3]  1991–1994 [4]  1991–1994 [5] 1991–1998 [6]  1995–1999
[7]   1999–2004 [8] 2000–2002 [9]   2003 [10]  2003 [11]  2004 [12]  2004
[13]   2005–2007 home [14]   2005–2007 away [15]  2007–2009 home [16]  2008 [17]  2007–2008 away [18]  2008–2009 away
[19]   2010–2011 home [20]   2010–2011 away [21]   2011–2012 home [22]   2011–2012 away [23] 2012-2013 home [24]  2012-2013 away
[25]2013– Home1
  • 1 Kit commemorating the US Soccer's centennial season.

Schedule and results[edit]Edit

Further information: 2013 in American soccer

The following is a list of matches from the past six months, as well as any future matches that have been scheduled.

US Soccer Schedule. USA: Fixtures and Results – FIFA.com

Current squad[edit]Edit

The following players were called up by Coach Tom Sermanni for the following matches:


Caps and goals are current as of February 9, 2014.

# Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps Goals Club
18 GK Nicole Barnhart October 10, 1981 (age 32) 54 0 [26]

FC Kansas City

21 GK Jillian Loyden June 25, 1985 (age 28) 7 0 [27]

Sky Blue FC

1 GK Hope Solo July 30, 1981 (age 32) 144 0 [28]

Seattle Reign FC

14 DF Stephanie Cox April 3, 1986 (age 27) 85 0 [29]

Seattle Reign FC

7 DF Crystal Dunn July 3, 1992 (age 21) 8 0 [30]

Washington Spirit

6 DF Whitney Engen November 28, 1987 (age 26) 11 1 [31]

Tyresö FF

11 DF Ali Krieger July 28, 1984 (age 29) 39 1 [32]

Washington Spirit

19 DF Kristen Mewis February 25, 1991 (age 22) 11 1 [33]

Boston Breakers

5 DF Kelley O'Hara August 4, 1988 (age 25) 40 0 [34]

Sky Blue FC

3 DF Christie Rampone (captain) June 24, 1975 (age 38) 289 4 [35]

Sky Blue FC

4 DF Becky Sauerbrunn June 6, 1985 (age 28) 51 0 [36]

FC Kansas City

16 DF Rachel Van Hollebeke August 26, 1985 (age 28) 109 5 [37]

Portland Thorns FC

25 MF Morgan Brian February 26, 1993 (age 20) 4 1 [38]

Virginia

12 MF Lauren Holiday September 30, 1987 (age 26) 96 21 [39]

FC Kansas City

22 MF Julie Johnston April 6, 1992 (age 21) 2 0 [40]

Chicago Red Stars

10 MF Carli Lloyd July 16, 1982 (age 31) 163 48 [41]

Western New York Flash

MF Samantha Mewis October 9, 1992 (age 21) 0 0 [42]

UCLA

9 MF Heather O'Reilly January 2, 1985 (age 29) 195 38 [43]

Boston Breakers

15 MF Megan Rapinoe July 5, 1985 (age 28) 77 23 [44]

Seattle Reign FC

17 MF Erika Tymrak August 7, 1991 (age 22) 3 1 [45]

FC Bayern Munich

2 FW Sydney Leroux May 7, 1990 (age 23) 45 26 [46]

Seattle Reign FC

23 FW Christen Press December 29, 1988 (age 25) 14 10 [47]

Tyresö FF

8 FW Amy Rodriguez February 17, 1987 (age 26) 104 26 [48]

FC Kansas City

20 FW Abby Wambach June 2, 1980 (age 33) 214 165 [49]

Western New York Flash

Recent call-ups[edit]Edit

The following players were named to a squad in the last six months.

Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps Goals Club Latest call-up
GK Adrianna Franch November 12, 1990 (age 23) 0 0 [50]

Western New York Flash

v. New Zealand; October 30, 2013
GK Alyssa Naeher April 20, 1988 (age 25) 0 0 [51]

Boston Breakers

v. New Zealand; October 30, 2013
DF Meghan Klingenberg August 2, 1988 (age 25) 6 0 [52]

Tyresö FF

v. New Zealand; October 30, 2013
DF Leigh Ann Robinson August 17, 1986 (age 27) 2 0 [53]

FC Kansas City

v. Brazil; November 10, 2013
MF Yael Averbuch November 3, 1986 (age 27) 26 1 [54]

Kopparbergs/Göteborg FC

v. Brazil; November 10, 2013
MF Amber Brooks January 23, 1991 (age 23) 1 0 [55]

Portland Thorns FC

v. Brazil; November 10, 2013
MF Vanessa DiBernardo May 15, 1992 (age 21) 0 0 [56]

Illinois

v. Mexico; September 3, 2013
MF Tobin Heath May 29, 1988 (age 25) 69 8 [57]

Paris Saint-Germain

v. New Zealand; October 30, 2013
FW Lindsey Horan May 26, 1994 (age 19) 2 0 [58]

Paris Saint-Germain

v. Brazil; November 10, 2013
FW Alex Morgan July 2, 1989 (age 24) 70 44 [59]

Portland Thorns FC

v. Brazil; November 10, 2013

Records[edit]Edit

Active players in bold, statistics as of February 9, 2014

The women's national team boasts the first six players in the history of the game to have earned 200 or more caps. These players have since been joined in the 200-cap club by Pu Wei and Li Jie of China and Birgit Prinz of Germany, as well as by two more Americans, Kate Markgraf and Abby WambachKristine Lilly is the first (and so far, only) player to earn more than 300 caps.

10 Most capped players[edit]Edit

Rank Player Caps Goals Years
1 Kristine Lilly 352 130 1987–2010
2 Christie Rampone 289 4 1997–
3 Mia Hamm 275 158 1987–2004
4 Julie Foudy 272 45 1987–2004
5 Joy Fawcett 239 27 1987–2004
6 Abby Wambach 214 164 2001–
7 Tiffeny Milbrett 204 100 1992–2006
8 Kate Markgraf 202 1 1998–2010
9 Heather O'Reilly 195 38 2002–
10 Brandi Chastain 192 30 1991–2004

Top 10 scorers[edit]Edit

Rank Player Caps Goals Years
1 Abby Wambach 214 164 2001–
2 Mia Hamm 275 158 1987–2004
3 Kristine Lilly 352 130 1987–2010
4 Michelle Akers 153 105 1985–2000
5 Tiffeny Milbrett 204 100 1992–2006
6 Cindy Parlow 158 75 1995–2006
7 Shannon MacMillan 176 60 1994–2006
8 Carin Jennings-Gabarra 117 53 1987–1996
9 Carli Lloyd 163 48 2005-
10 Julie Foudy 272 45 1987–2004

Top 10 Assists[edit]Edit

Rank Player Caps Assists Years
1 Mia Hamm 275 144 1987–2004
2 Kristine Lilly 352 105 1987–2010
3 Abby Wambach 214 67 2001-
4 Tiffeny Milbrett 204 61 1991–2005
5 Julie Foudy 272 55 1988–2004
6 Shannon MacMillan 176 50 1993–2005
7 Heather O'Reilly 195 48 2002–
8 Carin Jennings-Gabarra 117 47 1987-1996
9 Aly Wagner 131 42 1998–2008
10 Michelle Akers 153 36 1985-2000

Most goals scored in a match[edit]Edit

The record for most goals scored in a match by a member of the USWNT is five, which has been accomplished by six players.

Player Date Opponent Location Competition Line-up Notes
Brandi Chastain April 18, 1991 [60]

Mexico

Port-au-PrinceHaiti FIFA Women's World Cup Final Qualifying Tournament Substitute First 5 career international goals. Consecutive goals in the match. Final score: 12–0
Michelle Akers November 24, 1991 [61]

Chinese Taipei

FoshanChina 1991 FIFA Women's World Cup Starting Included first 3 goals of the match (9', 29', 33'). The only American to score 5 goals in a World Cup or Olympics match. Final score: 7–0
Tiffeny Milbrett November 2, 2002 [62]

Panama

Seattle, WashingtonUSA 2002 CONCACAF Women's Gold Cup Starting Included a hat trick in the first nine minutes. Final score: 9–0
Abby Wambach October 23, 2004 [63]

Republic of Ireland

Houston, TexasUSA International Friendly.

Fan Celebration Tour

Starting Played indoor in Reliant Stadium. Four goals were assists from Mia Hamm. Final score: 5–0
Amy Rodriguez January 20, 2012 [64]

Dominican Republic

Vancouver, British ColumbiaCanada 2012 CONCACAF Women's Olympic Qualifying Tournament Substitute

([65]46')

Biggest win by U.S. women's national team. Final score: 14–0
Sydney Leroux January 22, 2012 [66]

Guatemala

Vancouver, British ColumbiaCanada 2012 CONCACAF Women's Olympic Qualifying Tournament Substitute

([67]46')

First 5 career international goals in her second cap for U.S. women's senior team. Final score: 13–0

Head coaches[edit]Edit

Name Years Matches Won Tied Lost Win % Pts÷M
Totals 531 415 59 57 .837 2.46
[68]

Mike Ryan

1985 4 0 1 3 .125 0.25
[69]

Anson Dorrance

1986–1994 93 66 5 22 .737 2.18
[70]

Tony DiCicco

1994–1999 119 103 8 8 .899 2.66
[71]

Lauren Gregg

1997, 2000 3 2 1 0 .833 2.33
[72]

April Heinrichs

2000–2004 124 87 20 17 .782 2.27
[73]

Greg Ryan

2005–2007 55 45 9 1 .818 2.62
[74]

Pia Sundhage

2007–2012 107 91 10 6 .897 2.64
[75]

[76]Jillian Ellis

2012 7 5 2 0 .857 2.43
[77]

[78]Tom Sermanni

2013– 19 16 3 0 .921 2.68
Statistics as of February 13, 2014

World Cup record[edit]Edit

Host year in red
Year Result Matches Wins Draws Losses GF GA Coach
[79]

1991

Champions 6 6 0 0 25 5 Anson Dorrance
[80]

1995

Third place 6 4 1 1 15 5 Tony DiCicco
[81]

1999

Champions 6 5 1 0 18 3 Tony DiCicco
[82]

2003

Third place 6 5 0 1 15 5 April Heinrichs
[83]

2007

Third place 6 4 1 1 12 7 Greg Ryan
[84]

2011

Runners-up 6 3 2 1 13 7 Pia Sundhage
[85]

2015

To Be Determined
Total 6/6 36 27 5 4 98 32

Olympics record[edit]Edit

The team has participated in every Olympics tournament through 2012 and won a medal in each.

Year Result Matches Wins Draws Losses GF GA Coach
[86]

1996

Champions 5 4 1 0 9 3 Tony DiCicco
[87]

2000

Runners-up 6 4 1 1 9 5 April Heinrichs
[88]

2004

Champions 6 5 1 0 12 4 April Heinrichs
[89]

2008

Champions 6 5 0 1 12 5 Pia Sundhage
[90]

2012

Champions 6 6 0 0 16 6 Pia Sundhage
[91]

2016

To Be Determined
Total 5/5 29 24 3 2 58 23

CONCACAF Gold Cup record[edit]Edit

Year Result Matches Wins Draws Losses GF GA Coach
[92]

1991

Champions 5 5 0 0 49 0 Anson Dorrance
[93]

1993

Champions 3 3 0 0 13 0 Anson Dorrance
[94]

1994

Champions 4 4 0 0 16 1 Tony DiCicco
[95]

1998

Did not participate1
[96]

2000

Champions 5 4 1 0 24 1 April Heinrichs
[97]

[98]2002

Champions 5 5 0 0 24 1 April Heinrichs
[99]

2006

Champions 2 2 0 0 4 1 Greg Ryan
[100]

2010

Third place 5 4 0 1 22 2 Pia Sundhage
Total 7/8 29 27 1 1 152 6

1 The US team directly qualified for the 1999 FIFA Women's World Cup as hosts of the event. Because of this, they did not participate in the 1998 CONCACAF Championship, which was the qualification tournament for the World Cup.

Pan American Games record[edit]Edit

Year Result Matches Wins Draws Losses GF GA Coach
[101]

1999

Champions 6 5 1 0 22 2 Tony DiCicco
[102]

2003

Did not participate
[103]

2007

Runners-up 6 4 0 2 17 11 Greg Ryan
[104]

2011

Did not participate
Total 2/4 12 9 1 3 39 13

Other honors[edit]Edit

Champions (9): 2000, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2007, 2008, 2010, 2011, 2013
Runners-Up (4): 1994, 1999, 2006, 2009
Third Place (3): 1997, 1998, 2012
Champions (7): 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2002
Champions (7): 1998, 2003, 2004, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2011
Third Place (1): 2002
Champions (2): 2006, 2008
Champions (1): 1991
  • DFB Centenary Tournament[18]
Champions (1): 2000
  • Pacific Cup[19]
Champions (1): 2000
  • Brazil Cup[20]
Champions (1): 1996
Champions (1): 1990
Fourth Place (1): 1987
  • Canada Cup[23]
Champions (1): 1990
  • Australia Cup[24]
Champions (1): 2000
  • Tournoi International[25]
Champions (1): 1995
  • Chiquita Cup[26]
Champions (1): 1994
  • Tri-Nations Tournament[27]
Champions (1): 1994
  • Goodwill Games[28]
Champions (1): 1998
  • Columbus Cup[29]
Champions (1): 1993
Runners-Up (1): 2012
Runners-Up (1): 1987
Runners-Up (1): 1986
Third Place (1) 1988
Fourth Place (1): 1985

Media coverage[edit]Edit

ESPN and ESPN2 bring most coverage, with occasional coverage from Fox SoccerFox Sports en Espanol, and Galavisión.

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